Construction

Construction Contracts

Overview
Expert construction contract and project advisory services to support your budget, timeframe and commercial goals

As one of the few New Zealand law firms specialising in construction law, Hesketh Henry provides contract and project advice to minimise risk from inception to final completion. Our work can help turn commercial ideas into practical and profitable reality, because we make a point of understanding the vision and goals that are driving your project or transaction.

With an experienced construction lawyer on your side, you’ll be in a better position to avoid disputes, delays and unbeneficial compromises. Hesketh Henry’s construction law experts are able to assist with contract preparation and negotiation, risk assessments, project structures, procurement, and legislative and regulatory requirements. We can also engage the firm’s real estate and corporate commercial teams to further support the success of your project or transaction.

If your project is already underway or complete and you have disputes looming, we recommend you call on our construction litigation expertise.

Need advice on Construction Contracts?
Contact the expert team at Hesketh Henry.
Examples

Examples of work completed by our team include:

  • Advising a building supplier on IP, payment and liability issues;
  • Reviewing and negotiating various contract terms under head contracts, sub-contracts and supply agreements;
  • Updating contract terms for a specialist building repair contractor;
  • Preparing new commercial and residential contract terms for a large prefabricated building materials supplier;
  • Advising various parties to construction contracts on disputed variations, payment claims and rights under the Construction Contract Act 2002;
  • Reviewing and negotiating a wide range of construction and engineering contracts, including considerable experience with NZS3910 and it’s Variants, CCCS, IPENZ, etc; and
  • Advising a major insurance company in connection with developing a bespoke model construction contract for the remediation of multi unit properties damaged in the Christchurch earthquakes.
Key Contacts
Recommendations
Construction team ranked in the latest Legal500 Asia Pacific Directory 2018.
Recognised in The Asialaw Profile Directory 2018.
Recommended by The Doyle's Guide Directory

Insights & Opinion / Construction Contracts

Updated Subcontract Agreement: SA-2017
The SA-2009 form of Subcontract Agreement is commonly used in the construction industry. It has undergone a review and a new SA-2017 form has been produced.
3.07.2018 Posted in Construction Law & Health & Safety Law
Construction Law Update – May 2017
Recent Construction Law Decisions and Developments in New Zealand
22.05.2017 Posted in Construction Law
Clarification of retentions requirements for construction contracts
The retentions regime comes into force on 31 March 2017
25.10.2016 Posted in Construction Law
Consultants – Are you ready?
How will the changes to the Construction Contracts Act 2002 affect you?
23.08.2016 Posted in Construction Law
The Construction Landscape in New Zealand
It is now widely accepted that New Zealand is in the midst of the largest construction boom in 40 years.  For anyone working in or providing professional services to the construction sector, it is im...
22.12.2015 Posted in Construction Law
Getting the Deal Through: Construction
Download PDFHelen Macfarlane, together with Christina Bryant, Nick Gillies and Michael O’Brien are the authors of the New Zealand chapter of the 2015 edition of “Getting the Deal Through: Co...
9.03.2015 Posted in Construction Law
Changes to the Construction Contracts Act 2002
Introduction Since its introduction twelve years ago, the Construction Contracts Act 2002 (CCA) has become a cornerstone of New Zealand’s construction sector.  The CCA followed similar statutory in...
19.02.2015 Posted in Construction Law
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